Film Review: Hot Fuzz

Another motion picture from the witty talents of Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright. I wasn’t sure if I would be able to see Pegg without seeing the Tim Bisley in the character we was portraying, as a great testament to Pegg’s acting skill he manages to create a very distinct persona that holds the film separate from any of his other works.

There is a great deal of depth to this film, subtle pieces of information a sprinkled from the very start and you’re only reminded of them towards the very end; making for great re-watching. For example the Andies mockingly say they should call everyone in the village starting with ‘Aaron A. Aaronson’ whom we actually get to see at the very end.

A lot of the information is quite accurate as well, a copper I met through the European Jamboree told me that Police training scenario’s are portrayed in a fictitious village called Sandford in Gloucester, the place where the film is focused. Brilliant, there must’ve been some real investigation into Police procedures when writing the screenplay hopefully winning some awards over the next year!

A laugh a minute film suitable for all occasions and company, certainly worth my £5 cinema ticket, and I wouldn’t put it past myself to making it an addition to my DVD collection in the future.

Rating: 96%

Film Review: Casino Royale

I’ve just been to see a special preview of the 21st Film in the Bond Franchise, Casino Royale. First and foremost Daniel Craig, yes he’s handsome, young but not too young, strong, virile and witty but he lacks the charm and charisma of previous (or future depending on your perspective) Bonds.

Don’t get me wrong, this is one of the better Bond films and certainly worth going to see at the cinema but it certainly isn’t the best. Its different approach to Bond, his reactions and the story whilst refreshing just seemed to drag down the pace we’re been accustomed to for the past 40 years. I mean no ‘Q’, No major gadgetry, no car chase what the hell happened? Okay they’ve shifted the original game from Baccarat to Texas Hold’em attributed to the recent development in Pop Culture so fellow gamblers empathise with the tension but it wasn’t enough to hold the film for me.

Special effects, as far as I could tell there weren’t any, so hurrah! The stunts looked real and from the glimpses I’ve seen on the television they were actually performed as opposed to using synthesbians.

All in all a good film, but if you were down to your last £10 and it came down to a choice between seeing this or getting a train ticket home I would get the train ticket. Worth a watch, perhaps a positive comment here or there but I’m not completely satisfied.

Film Review: Superman Returns – The IMAX Experience

On the doomed planet Krypton, a wise scientist placed his infant son into a spacecraft and launched him to Earth.

Raised by a kind farmer and his wife, the boy grew up to become our greatest protector… Superman.

But when astronomers discovered the distant remains of his home world, Superman Disappeared.

This was my second viewing of this slice of cinematic history, I wasn’t particularly impressed with the 3D effects though, either it was the glasses being bent out of shape, just plain ineffective or my position in the theatre but I really didn’t feel part of the film. Falling with the plane as Superman tries to correct it’s tail spin was completely wasted on me and it all as a bit of a blur.

Continue reading Film Review: Superman Returns – The IMAX Experience

Film Review: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest

Wowzers, good sequel. Its not quite what I expected through, I anticipated a movie that felt like the first half of an adventure not an enduring quest that draws out the action. What I mean is the punches felt spaced out rather than a rapid succession. The first film was and still is a swashbuckling adventure the second more of a journey across middle earth to save the entire world.

In most cases where sequels are desired but the companies funding them are unsure of their success endings aren’t left closed. The creators have always said they wanted to make more than one but obviously they didn’t thread the first stories into the sequels. This often leads to sequels having stories that are a little far fetched, they twist the facts to account for the past film and leave out others. Dead Man’s Chest marvellously takes off exactly where you would expect Captain Jack Sparrow, Will Turner and Ms. Swann to be after such an absence.

The entire film cried quality, I ask, if there were any special effects (besides the monsters) I couldn’t see them. The digital stunt doubles were seamless unless they got actual people to do the stunts in which case I’m insanely happy because you don’t get that enough these days. Sound was beautiful, I love a good score to a film especially when you get to hear it in full dolby surround sound!

Towards the end it seemed like they were trying to do too much, the 3 way sword fight for example. Not quite as entertaining as the sequence in the first film in the blacksmith forge, the snappy dialogue and movement around the environment, floor, press/furnace, rafters kept it interesting whereas going around and around on the watermill and standing in the middle of an expansive beach didn’t quite get my juices flowing. Admittedly the beach sequence was ‘dull’ to not distract from the ‘humour’ being spouted by Ms. Swann but it just wasn’t funny enough.

The ending was colossal, such a grandiose finale for Jack and a surprise I never saw coming. Certainly kept me interested in returning to see the 3rd instalment and hopefully not too long a wait a la Matrix Reloaded to Revolutions (6 months give or take) in comparison to the Lord of the Rings’ 12 months.

Rating: 88%

Film Review: War of the Worlds

War Of The Worlds 2005 Film Poster

Another Tom Cruise film directed by Steven Speilberg, those that did enjoy Minority Report probably will enjoy this film; both exhibit fantastic special effects and good performances.

War of the Worlds brings two methods seldom used for protagonist movies to audiences, firstly we spend the majority of the film seeing the main character Ray Ferrier (Cruise) lead his family as fast as he can in the opposite direction to danger. Usually something expected of minor cast members, example in the film Independence Day where one of the main characters runs straight to his military base to help in the effort despite seeing everyone around him running to the hills. Whilst Ferrier’s behaviour adds to the suspense for roughly three quarters of the film there is the inevitable act of courage that is just enough to save the day and adds some hope to a seemingly dire situation.

The second which is held to rigidly we see everything the main cast see, on the one occasion when we might see a full blown military engagement with the enemy the main character charges to within meters of seeing the action in a vain attempt to stop his son going “unto the breach” and retreats to protect his youngest child and run for safety.

Whilst some scenes seem preposterous with the sheer volume of destruction shown its worth noting that such scenes are nothing short of what has been seen across the news in 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. I think that the scenes are creative a giving you a full grasp of the situation and drawing you in.

A film worth watching if only once, this will likely be revered for a decade or so but I doubt that it will hold it’s weight as long as 1953 H.G. Wells counterpart.

Rating: 67%