Film Review: Night At The Museum 2

I really enjoyed the first Night at the Museum. To anthropermophise inanimate objects like statues and exhibits and see them interact as what they embody is hilarious. How would cowboys who are often depicted operating solo cooperate with Roman infantry who function as teams; The perfect situation for comedy!

The story: The Night guard Larry Daley has left the museum and started a company selling his inventions such as the glow in the dark flashlight (torch to you and me), the museum has lost the attraction of the public and is being updated with technological aids, such as holograms, to make it interesting once again. For this the exhibits have to move and the tablet of Akmunrah with them, not prepared for the calamity that will ensue Larry tries to stop it. On the first night in their new homes on of the Pharaoh Kamunrah tries to takeover and Jedimiah the cowboy calls Larry for help.

With such high standards set in the first film any sequel is likely to be cursed with what happens to most; it tanks. For me the subtitle “Battle of the Smithsonian” is misleading, I imagined all the exhibits in the Smithsonians 19 museums to come alive and face each other in a slapstick engagement. What we end up seeing really is several new characters alongside many of the old ones.

Night At The Museum 2 Cowboys And Romans

Don’t get me wrong here, the film was executed beautifully, the animation was vivid and blended, the story just interesting enough and good acting all round. The gags come thick and fast, blowing away the expectation on jokes dug up from the dirt and tried on something new, they makers kept it fresh.

I’m not usually one to enjoy Ben Stiller Movies (and I’m not the only one) because of his insistence on playing OTT characters, but when he does play ‘ordinary’ people as Mosh puts it I quite like them.

Night at the Museum 2: Amy Adams as Amelia Earhart

Something I didn’t like very much was that Amelia Earhart was portrayed as alone in her flight, she was navigated by Fred Noonan, where was he? I’m not trying to undermine her accomplishments, but Neil Armstrong wasn’t alone getting to the Moon, the often remembered Buzz Aldrin landed in the Lunar module as well and the seldom remembered Michael Collins orbited just above in the Command module. And even then there are hundreds/thousands of unseen and unsung people that helped and planned the Apollo 11 mission.

Sailor Kissing Girl In Times Square V Day

There were some really great sequences in the film such as when they dived into the photograph Sailor Kissing Girl in Times Square (by Alfred Eisenstaedt), seeing all the celebrations and their reactions to the out of place Night guard, Aviatrix and their attire. (P.S. Keep watching the credits for more on this 😉 ). The octopus was a great creation (and I’m not making this up like The Goonies did) although I was expecting it to be ferocious rather than angry.

Summery: you don’t need to have seen the first one to watch this, it is a great movie to chill out with or to entertain the kids with and very few should be disappointed.

  • Picture: 8/10
  • Sound: 8/10
  • Effects: 9/10
  • Story: 8/10

Everything on Pirates: Origins

I’ve just been watching a National Geographic documentary on the notorious pirate ‘Blackbeard’ called Blackbeard’s Lost Pirate Ship. Personally it raised a lot of questions on what I don’t know about pirates (which are considered one of the coolest things to be in pop culture). They’ve always had a certain cool factor and this has only grown with the Pirates of the Caribbean Movies. I suppose what I know started when I was little, I was introduced to the common stereotype is an eye patch wearing, peg legged, parrot adorned, black bearded captain flying a jolly roger from his ship. And its not surprising that a lot of that is an amalgamation of several people! To keep things simple I’ve started at the earliest known reference and I’m going to work my way forward hopefully you enjoy it.

Pirate Origins: The Sea People

The earliest consistent known acts of what we consider piracy happened in the late Bronze age, 13th Century BC, by the Phahroh Merneptah, he simply refered to them as “the foreign peoples of the sea” and drawn in the Medinet Habu with feathers. Whilst not the traditional view of pirates with cannons and galleon ships they made many inventions which aided sailing helping to keep them ahead of the local authorities and are still in widespread use today. Such innovations include the loose-footed or ‘free’ lower yardarm which greatly improved sailing under unfavourable wind conditions, the crows nest for early warning alarms and the reintroduction of the eastern use of ashlar (dressed and mortar-less brick) which was first seen 2700 years earlier! The sea peoples were also had origins of many ideas we have of Vikings, having horned helmets and identical prows at stern and aft.

Alas their raiding of undefended/unfortified ports finalised a collapse of Egyptian economy but not before they were attacked en masses and soon got them a reputation, which lead to attacks struck back at the Egyptians by sea and by land with help of the Libyans. Despite having less advanced ships the Egyptians were able to outmanoeuvre the Sea Peoples with oars and sails inshore in southern Canaan (Philistia). This coupled with bombardment of the shieldless Sea People with arrows from Seaborne archers prevented their swordsmen and javaliers from succeeding on land.

Those that weren’t killed or captured are presumed to have merged with the local indigenous peoples maintaining their enigmatic origins to this very date. (Which is why I’ve linked out to so many places as information is very, very scattered!)