Walking the Halls

Being in a rarely visited part of University and having a spare 30 minutes to twiddle my thumbs I started to look around, I mean actually look, fully take the time to appreciate my surroundings. I looked not with the perspective of someone in a corridor but a walkway for thousands of people heading somewhere, not just to their next seminar but beyond that.

At Secondary School most of us are told that if we work hard enough we can be anything we want, Firemen, Actors, Space Cowboys, anything. Of those that ‘had a dream’ for their career few at this point will have achieved it, most will still be on the path to succeeding their ambition.

And that’s where I’m standing, on their path. If I stood here long enough I could see a myriad of people pass by each with their own destiny. That guy that just brushed past me could design the next space shuttle, or the girl ‘over there’ could correct the flaws in our government.

Whilst those feats are important and deserve attention surely participating in how they got there is just as important, I was here as they passed in the halls am I more or less important than the person standing next to them at their grand opening?

Film Review: A Sound of Thunder

A Sound of Thunder Butterfly on a dark background Movie Poster

Synopsis: In the future the ability to travel through time has been mastered and a new branch of the Government created to regulate the company “Time Safari” that uses this technology to travel to the Cretaceous period and take down an allosaurus 5 minutes before it dies. There are 3 rules: Don’t change anything in the past; don’t leave anything behind; and most important, don’t bring anything back…..

At the conclusion of this film I was left with thinking how unrepresentative the title of this film is, okay at a stretch you could associate the Dinosaurs foot-steps with the thunderous pound oh so brilliantly demonstrated in Jurassic Park, but as I say this is a stretch.

That being said there are many good points to this film, one of which is the post-modern environments the characters are placed in, the detail is comprehensive and the variety of extra elements such as the broad array of automobiles driving up and down the street. However when something affects the environment such as the pavement collapsing the street apparently has no depth and the illusion shattered (pun intended).

Edward Burns remains austere for the entirety of the film, perhaps its his guise for portraying the severity of the storyline or perhaps its something for more amateur… Ben Kingsley delivers a sturdy performance demonstrating that he’s always on his ‘A’ game even if the highest prospects of the film are sub-terrainian.

Reading further on this film and finds it was originally scheduled for realise in 2003 and only just made it to DVD now because the original production company went bankrupt, still you have to be amazed at the graphics quality in comparison to the big budget movies like Star Wars and The Lord of the Rings Trilogy that came out that year and they must’ve had at least 10 times the amount on CG imagery.

The premise is promising, reminiscent of Thrill Seekers, a low budget 90s film, also about the pitfalls of time travel, predictably even when rules are set by ourselves for the benefit of all humanity someone has to take a shortcut because their egomania deludes them into thinking they are above causality.

Certainly a blockbuster if a some post-production financial aid came through sooner or a some thorough dialogue adjustments made but sadly time travel doesn’t exist and we will never know. There are better films to spend your £3 rental on, ranking this one somewhere close to the top of the sucky film pile.

Rating: 48%