How Blogging grew into Microblogging

So far I’ve written about how blogging got started, its fairly interesting from a historical point of view but the story doesn’t have any quirks. Microblogging has at least some irony to it as blogging, the writing of posts and articles grew into something smaller.

With the advent of Web 2.0 social media kicked in, rather than just reading about news or businesses people where encouraged to write about themselves for friends in a socially interconnected setting, most probably on myspace or bebo.

As you can imagine writing a decent blog post about what your doing can easily take an hour or 300 words (and even then its a little short) so with today’s small attention span people rarely made the effort. With people wanting updates but not willing to read/write that much posts got shorter and shorter. When facebook and its traditional 4-6 word sentence came along everybody jumped on-board, you could connect just as easily and small updates were the focus of the main feed.

Meanwhile, blogging and content management systems soon started incorporating smaller scale posts called ‘asides’ into their feature set. On a persons blog you’d find a long stream of content and in the sidebar (hence asides) were smaller, more frequent updates to keep your interest between the main article releases.

Now there are the above mentioned social networks focusing on connectedness and blogs concentrated on content. By combining peoples ability to mini post with similar content you quickly get updates on the variety of content you choose which gives rises to websites such as Twitter and Moodmill devoted to just the 30 second / 140 character post. No longer do you have a main feed with all the drivel about causes, quizzes and games controlled by a complex set of privacy and filter settings that few understand or care to adjust but a main feed of what you do or do not want to follow.


There you have it peer pressure turned what essentially started out as an intellectually stimulating analysis of the social scene into pithy comments on day to day rituals.